Meet The Performers

Visiting Artist - Viola

Paul Neubauer

Viola

PAUL NEUBAUER's exceptional musicality and effortless playing distinguish him as one of this generation's quintessential artists. Balancing a solo career with performances as an Artist of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Neubauer at age 21 was the youngest principal string player in the New York Philharmonic's history. He is the Orchestra and Chamber Music Director of the OK Mozart Festival in Bartlesville, Oklahoma.

Mr. Neubauer has recently released an all Schumann recital album with pianist Anne-Marie McDermott for Image Recordings and recorded works that were written for him: Wild Purple for solo viola by Joan Tower for Naxos; Viola Rhapsody a concerto by Henri Lazarof on Centaur Records; and Soul Garden for viola and chamber ensemble by Derek Bermel on CRI. His recording of the Walton Viola Concerto was recently re-released on Decca.

In 2005, he premiered Joan Tower's Purple Rhapsody, a viola concerto commissioned for him by seven orchestras and the Koussevitsky Foundation. During his six year tenure with the New York Philharmonic, Paul Neubauer appeared as soloist with that orchestra in over twenty performances. One particularly memorable performance was the New York premiere of Krzysztof Penderecki's Viola Concerto with Penderecki conducting. He has appeared with over 100 orchestras throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia including the Los Angeles and Rochester Philharmonics, the Orchestra of St. Luke's, the San Francisco, National, St. Louis, Dallas, Indianapolis, Puerto Rico and Cincinnati Symphonies, the Bavarian State Radio Orchestra, the Helsinki Philharmonic, the Hungarian Radio Orchestra, the Orchester der Beethovenhalle Bonn (with whom he performed the world premiere of the newly revised version of Bartók's Viola Concerto), the Kansas City Symphony (premiering Tobias Picker's Viola Concerto), the English Chamber Orchestra (performing the world premiere of Gordon Jacob's Viola Concerto no. 2), and the Knoxville Symphony (premiering David Ott's Viola Concerto).

In 1989, Mr. Neubauer made his Carnegie Hall Debut playing the first performance of Joel Philip Friedman's Concerto for Viola and Orchestra with the National Orchestral Association. He has also appeared with the Stockholm Chamber Orchestra, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, Hong Kong Philharmonic, Ensemble orchestral de Paris, Orquesta Filharmonica de Buenos Aires, Bournemouth Symphony, and the Taipei National Symphony. In Rome, he has performed with violinist Vladimir Spivakov and the Orchestra of the National Academy of Santa Cecelia. Other collaborations include performances with Andre Watts and Vladimir Feltsman at the Metropolitan Museum of Art; with Joshua Bell and Steven Isserlis at London's Wigmore and Queen Elizabeth Hall’s; and with Pinchas Zukerman, James Galway, Vladimir Spivakov and Alicia de Larrocha at the Mostly Mozart Festival. He has also collaborated with the Emerson, Juilliard, Cleveland, Fine Arts, Orion, Borromeo, Miami, and Brentano quartets.

Mr. Neubauer's musical activities are consistently creative. In a pair of highly acclaimed New York premieres, Paul Neubauer performed Bartók's Viola Concerto (which he helped to revise along with Bartók's son, Peter and composer Nelson Dellamaggiore), and Max Bruch's Double Concerto for Clarinet and Viola with clarinetist David Shifrin. He also gave the North American premiere of the Detlev Müller-Siemens Viola Concerto and Richard Suter's Three Nocturnes for Viola and Orchestra. He has been featured as a special guest artist of the New York City Ballet at Lincoln Center in performances of Viola Alone, and on the popular radio show A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor. He was very successful as the director of Voilà Viola, a viola festival held at Merkin Hall in New York, and has toured the United States with pianist Christopher O'Riley, violinist Pamela Frank, and cellist Carter Brey.

In addition to his innumerable orchestral, recital, and festival appearances, Paul Neubauer is accessible to a broad range of television and radio audiences through Live from Lincoln Center telecasts with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. He has been featured on CBS's Sunday Morning; in recital on PBS's Front Row Center and In Concert; on Argentinean, Brazilian, and Mexican television as soloist with orchestras; on National Public Radio's Performance Today and Morning Edition, on St. Paul Sunday Morning, as well as on international radio performances in Canada, England, Germany, Hungary, Norway, and Yugoslavia.

An active recording artist, Mr. Neubauer's recordings with Delos include works by Quincy Porter and David Diamond, and Loeffler's Two Rhapsodies. On New World Records he has recorded Bright Sheng's Three Chinese Love Songs; with RCA Red Seal, Beethoven's Serenades (with James Galway); with Argo, Aaron Jay Kernis's Still Movement with Hymn; and on Sony Classical, Hindemith's Octet for Winds and Strings. His extensive discography with the Lincoln Center Chamber Music Society includes works by Debussy, Mozart, Beethoven, Wolpe, Kodaly, Dohnanyi, Dvorak, Wourinen, Schubert, Wolpe, Weber and Knussen as well as the complete Brandenburg Concerti.

Among Paul Neubauer's numerous awards are First Prize in the Mae M. Whitaker International Competition, the D'Angelo International Competition, and the Lionel Tertis International Viola Competition, at age 17. He has been the recipient of a Solo Recitalist's Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and a special prize from the Naumburg Foundation, which awarded him an Alice Tully Hall recital debut. Moreover, the Epstein Young Artists Program has sponsored him and in 1989 became the first violist chosen to receive an Avery Fisher Career Grant.

Born in Los Angeles and currently residing in New York City, Mr. Neubauer studied with Alan de Veritch, Paul Doktor, and William Primrose. He holds a Master's Degree from The Juilliard School where he is now a member of the faculty. He also teaches at Mannes College.

This biography is based on information provided by the artist, ensemble or representatives thereof and may only be as current as the artist’s or ensemble’s most recent performance at Symphony Center.